Monthly Archives: June 2015

Very Sad News…Passing of Brad Coustan

Dear Friends and Colleagues-

It is with great sadness that I write this message.  Last night Brad Coustan ended his long and courageous battle against Multiple Myeloma. He always said “you don’t beat cancer by not dying, but by how you keep living”, and he meant it. Brad was a great father, husband, and friend to so many.  He was a long time member of the TFS family, and his presence and eternal optimism will be sorely missed.

The funeral service is confirmed for Tuesday, June 9 at 1pm at:

Bernheim-Apter-Kreitzman Suburban Funeral Chapel

68 Old Short Hills Road

Livingston, NJ 07039

The family will be sitting shiva at the Coustan home at 630 Clark Street, Westfield, NJ 07090

Tuesday, June 9, 5-9pm

Wednesday, June 10, 4-8pm

The family has requested that, in lieu of flowers or food, to please make donations to the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF) in Brad’s memory.  If you would like to make a donation to MMRF in Brad’s honor, you are welcome to do so by visiting:   http://www.themmrf.org/. Click on “Donate” – choose how you would like to donate and make sure to note that it is for a “HONOR / MEMORIAL GIFT” and you can include Brad Coustan’s name.

#BradStrong

Long-Term Careless

Cost, insurability and policy features often come up during a discussion, but there are other factors worth talking about. (Illustration: Ikon Images/Corbis)An article from ThinkAdvisor

Read some highlights below or click here for the full article

“According to a recent study conducted by Genworth in collaboration with J&K Solutions, only 11% of adults say they’ve bought LTCI.”

“Advisors should keep those statistics in mind when they consider the long-term stability of client assets. They should also consider these from the first study: 45% of respondents have no plans to buy LTCI; 32% say it’s too expensive and 30% have never thought about it or don’t want to think about it.”

“The study found care recipients being cared for by family members were often under more stress than their caregivers. Nelson said, “They felt bad about being a burden to their loved ones.”